A brief history of western film culture

A brief history of western film culture


Basic information
The time of publication:1970-1
Press:Wuhan University press
Author:Zhou Wenji
Pages:226
BookTitle:A brief history of western film culture
Summary of contents
Western film culture history. "History" western film culture is rich in content, explain straightaway, can be used as all kinds of school related professional teaching materials, but also can be used as high school students and training quality of practitioners of the ideal material, also can be used as the readers to learn film culture reference book. 
Author intro
Zhou Wenji, male, the Han nationality, born in 1966, Hunan province Chaling county. 1988 June graduated from the Hunan Xiangtan Normal College (now Hunan University of Science and Technology) and work there. In 2004 June, received a master's degree from Central South University in foreign linguistics and applied linguistics. Currently associate professor, master tutor of Hunan University of Science and Technology. In all kinds of academic journals published more than 20, presided over the Hunan province social science planning projects, Hunan Province Department of education scientific research and the teaching reform project to each one. 
Catalog
CHAPTER 1HISTORICAL HIGHLIGHTSCHAPTER 2CHRONOLOGY OF MAJOR EVENTSCHAPTER 3A LONG WAY TO MOVIES3.1Introduction3.2A Brief History of Pre-cinema3.3Pinhole images3.4The Camera Obscure Effect3.5The Magic Lantern3.6The Phantasmagoria3.7Persistence of Vision3.8Photography3.9Motion Study Analysis3.10 Commercialization of Film3.11 Historical BackgroundCHAPTER 4MOST FAMOUS CHARACTERS IN THE HISTORY OF CINEMATOGRAPHYCHAPTER 5ACADEMY AWARD WINNERS AND OTHER MAJOR FILMAPPENDIX 1 TOP GROSSING FILMS OF ALL TIMESAPPENDIX 2 GLOSSARY
Chapter abstract
CHAPTER 1 HISTORICAL HIGHLIGHTSIn the period previous to the 1930s, the predominant form of filmmaking was that of the crank camera. This is not to say that motor-driven cameras were not possible.However, the motors to advance the film were so large that they were simply to cumbersome to be effective. Thus, it was the cameraman himself who would crank the film at a steady rate to expose the frames. When it came to showing the film, on the other hand, motor driven projectors were quite convenient, and by the 1920s a standard 24-frame per second was established for projecting films. Filming, however, remained unstandardized due to the inherent variation in recording speeds, since it depended directly on the cameraman. An experienced cameraman was capable of filming an entire film at approximately the same speed, yet often variations were made in the recording speed for dramatic effect. Decreasing the number of cranks, for example, exposed fewer frames and thus when projected at the stand Ard 24 frames created the frenzied action that characterized much of the Vaudeville cinema.The French filmmaker Georges Melies was among the first to employ changing backDrops and costumes to tell his story. Up until that point many films were only a few minutes long taking place on a single set. Changing sets and costumes opened avast range of new possibilities and spurred further growth in the fledgling industry. As the film industry expanded in America, filmmakers found an increasing need to establish a single location at which they could build sets and film undisturbed. The bright sunlight, relative stability of climate, and varied terrain found in California made it an ideal place to film, much of the reason for the industrys concentration there.During this time, films were shot on a single reel, resulting in filmstrips that were only 15-20 minutes. Independent producers pioneered the use of double reel filmmaking during the years before the First World War. This allowed much longer films and opening the door for further opportunity, both financially and creatively, as well as bringing into being the double reel camera that became such an icon of movie P Roduction.
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